Have the German’s created a footballing blueprint for the next generation?

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The German national team is renowned for its ruthless efficiency, resilience and flawless organisation – characteristics England has been on the receiving end of too many times.

It now seems the German’s have further developed a footballing platform that works at a club level, something that the rest of the world can only admire – for the time being at least. Maybe it’s an equivalent of the old ‘Total football’ born by the Dutch.

Back to the drawing board

What you’ve witnessed in the Champions League over the past few months hasn’t occurred out of chance, the German FA have completely overhauled an already successful footballing system and gambled with something unique. Back at the 2002 World Cup, Germany was playing effective yet simple football, conceding just once en-route to the final. However, Brazil completely surpassed the German’s with a 2-0 victory.

Both finalists were complete polar opposites; as mentioned, Germany a well-organised unit, relying on formation and tactics. Compared to Brazil; boasting individual talent right through their squad with players capable of turning the game on its head in a second – a stereotypical Brazilian trait nonetheless.

During that time, Germany relied on poor performances by their opposition, lucky breaks and dominance from set pieces. All negative factors that contributed to their defeat against Brazil. Luckily for Germany though, the DFB (German FA) had already initiated the development of entirely new footballing blueprint and it was only a matter of time before it flourished. As a footballer you admire this because they acted against an already proven philosophy, a philosophy that required just a few minor tweaks to perfect. However, instead of those minor tweaks, the German’s reconstructed their entire footballing platform.

A zero tolerance for failure

It began back in 2000 when Germany embarrassingly exited the European Championships picking up just one point – one of the very few tournaments England can actually claim victory over Germany in recent years. The DFB acted instantaneously, creating the DFL (German Football League) to manage the 1 and 2 Bundesliga. The DFL were dogged and never wanted a repeat of Euro 2000. All teams in the top two tiers were required for their academies to have a certain number of indoor training facilities, a certain number of pitches, massage rooms and physiotherapists. Note the German’s zero tolerance for failure, and ultimately their keenness to change, to move forwards. As a fan, I’m envious. As an English player I’m embarrassed.

It was within these academies that saw the most significant change: at least 12 players within the academy must be eligible to play for Germany. A method guaranteed to help nurture the success of the national team too, a subject the English FA still appears stuck at.

A Guardian article from 2010 read: Christian Seifert, the Bundesliga’s chief executive said that the national team’s stark improvement was a direct result of the overhaul of Germany’s academy system, with all 36 clubs in the two Bundesliga divisions now obliged to operate centrally regulated academies before being given a licence to play in the league. Of the 23-man national squad now in South Africa, 19 came from Bundesliga academies, with the other four from Bundesliga 2 academies.

The 50+1 rule – a secret for scalable success?

Implemented to promote competition within the league, to create sustainable excellence, the 50+1 rule requires that members must own at least 51% of the club, removing the possibility of an Abramovich or Sheikh takeover. Thus helping nurture new talent, as the funds and mindset of those businessmen are eradicated, diminishing the chances of a multimillion-pound transfer deal.  In the years that followed this new ruling, the Bundesliga struggled, as academies were still developing and spending was out synced, in comparison to the rest of Europe. A necessary short-term medicine, it would appear.

Seifert went on to say, “This way you don’t have a foreign owner who doesn’t really care for the national teams,” said Seifert. “The clubs have a very strong relationship with the FA: we are all engaged in discussions [about youth development].”    

Domestic dominance

With Borussia Dortmund and Bayern Munich dominating the Champions League this time around, it’s little surprise that they captured first and second spot retrospectively in the Bundlesliga. The academy implementation was all too evident in their rise to victory this season – Dortmund containing the likes of: Reus, Gotze, Hummels and Schmelzer all players that surged through the academy ranks. I was intrigued into the performances of Dortmund and Bayern throughout their domestic and European campaign, so I spoke to some friends over at Prozone Sports analysis who provided me with the following data for the domestic performances:

dom2
In almost perfect tandem form, with the exception of Dortmund’s forward pass %, ball retention and final third entry success %, Bayern were the highest ranked team for all categories – coinciding with their top spot finish. Subsequently Dortmund ranked second for all those categories, excluding those mentioned, matching their second place finish.

European Dominance: A story of possession

Dortmund and Bayern are not only playing a catch-me-if-you-can game in their domestic league, but it seems their European dominance this season will become the envy of the rest of Europe too. I also obtained some data (I love Prozone!) from both semi-finals of the Champions League:

The rank in the table below indicates where the club lies among the 32 Champions League teams this season.

Prozone-eur

In the Champions League, the German clubs’ have been less dominant at retaining the ball. Instead, their overall usage of possession – turning it into meaningful attacks – has been above average; matching or bettering the Spanish clubs on the whole.

Prozone told me…

  • Over the two legs, Bayern attempted 43.0% of their passes forward, compared to Barcelona’s 35.8% – a clear indication that Bayern changed from their possession-based game to a more direct, counter-attacking approach.
  • Dortmund took a similar approach; 52% of their passes were forward over the two legs against Real Madrid, whereas their opponents attempted 48% of their passes forward.
  • Both German teams adapted their games to beat their Spanish opponents but still outshot their opponents in the first legs 25-12 in total (17-9 for shots inside the box) to
take a combined 7-goal lead into the second legs.

Although a little premature, just like Bayern, only last season Barcelona was playing the same cat and mouse game with the rest of Europe. Now it seems the roles have reversed.

Copycats to follow

Barca’s European dominance over the past five years is one of the most entertaining styles of play ever witnessed. Now it seems the German’s have raised the bar and the rest of Europe find themselves rerouting their style of play yet again.

And just like those teams who chased Barca for so many years found – attempting to imitate a team who’ve instigated an innovative blueprint are unlikely to be out-maneuvered, simply because they’re already five steps ahead of everyone else.

Tip-tap football

Another key factor to the success of Dortmund and Bayern is their solidarity, playing as a team, fighting for one another. I watched Dortmund last weekend with a supposed weakened team and, despite that being the case, their solid core of a team was apparent – they ultimately won. But you compare this to likes of Real and Barcelona, and this begins to highlight the major differences. Once you begin to remove the likes of Messi, Xavi and Iniesta the style of football their team’s built around begins to suffer. There’s an over-reliance on individuals as oppose to building a platform and selecting players accordingly. And this has been evident in Barca’s cup run this season – Messi continually kept their Champions League run alive.

Now what?

Many clubs like AC Milan and Manchester United have decreased spending for a fear of sanctions against Uefa’s Financial Fair Play introduction next season. Already, it seems the German teams have little to worry about from a business perspective; expenditure is low, and considering their starting XI costs just €40.6, it would appear they’ve created the perfect footballing platform to help cultivate fresh talent, all a while developing a national team and best of all, there’s no foreign majority owner.

Whilst many claim the Premier League is the best the league worldwide – from an entertainment perspective I’d agree – yet in comparison to the Bundesliga it remains unsustainable and that’s a worry – you only have to look at Portsmouth to see this.

It now seems the Premier League has reached a cross roads; it can continue to overspend, causing loses and run the risk of sanctioning from Uefa over the next few years, or it can cut back, develop a stringent academy system, building English football back to the dominant force it once was. It’ll take many years and just as the German’s experienced, a dip in national and domestic form is likely.

Speaking as an England fan, I’d welcome change to help develop the national side for a successful future. But as a devotee to the Premier League, I expect those years spent building a rigorous platform would possibly hamper the Premier League’s reputation as one of the World’s most exciting leagues, albeit for a few years.

Would you welcome a new football philosophy? As ever, let me know your thoughts below and I’ll do my best to reply.

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135 comments
vadoconu
vadoconu

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RoryStafford
RoryStafford

Compelling analysis Joey. I hope for English football's sake someone in power in the FA reads this.

SimonMichaelRobinson
SimonMichaelRobinson

Great article although I thought the Bayern Munich squad cost a fair bit more than €40.6 or have I misunderstood?

DaveHendo
DaveHendo

Greate article and no surprise that by going back to the basics, the Germans have achieved what English football dreams about. This highlights again the reasons the English national team fails to deliver success and why English Premimer League (EPL) teams are progressively achieving less in Europe (can't say that Chelsea won last years Champions League playing beautiful football):- * too many overrated, overpaid foreign players * too many foreign owners demanding instant success * youth development not given a chance (how many top english players play regularly in the EPL? becoming less & less) * too relient on the money provided by BSKYB along with high match day ticket prices to allow payment of exhorbitant wages to players. * over ambitious expectations of EPL clubs and the national team We continually hear, on Sky, that the EPL is the best league in the world but is it? Sky would say so as it helps sell Sky Sports subscriptions. Perhaps the EPL may have the best competition but with the same teams winning the league does this demonstrate good competition. This years, and previous years NPowerChampionship shows better whole league competition. You can't say that the EPL has the best teams in the world now as they aren't continually winning the top European competitions. England has one World Cup win ( helped by home advantage and the favourable decision of Russion officials) but other than that the national side has flattered to deceive though, according to media and others, are going to win almost every tournament they enter. So does anyone in English football have the power to make change along the lines of the German FA model, I think not. Money talks, and as the article highlights, are foreign owners interested in the development of English football at club level to the benefit of the game at a national level?

BYoung7
BYoung7

Very solid and accurate points, and interesting supporting stats as well. Do you see it as a problem for the Bundesliga that the wealthy behemoth that is Bayern continues to attract and acquire the very best of talent from their league rivals. Or is this a necessary evil for bringing popularity and recognition to the league from Bayern's domestic and European success?

MrRae1000
MrRae1000

This is a great article .... and your arguments are solid. But I can't help thinking this is what Fernandes and Redknapp are about at QPR. Andros Townsend, Dwight Gayle and Connor Wickham are all  targets. Their stated plan is to rebuild around a blend of fresh young English talent and season experience. So, given that, would staying at OM as opposed to QPR comply with your ambitions? And HR is the most successful English Manager of recent years... 

KingHenryFifth
KingHenryFifth

I wish there were more articles in the mainstream media like this... seems like they only want to tell you about the next "greatest" superstar Man City and Chelsea will be signing for £300 million this summer on £200k a week wages... It's disgusting to watch City and Chelsea do this to our league. Abramovic ruined the Premier League when he set a precedent for billion-pound take-overs of average football clubs. FA really need to sort it out but could not give a flying fuck as the more money that ends up in this league means more money for all parties involved. 

DeTorsten
DeTorsten

great article. anyway from the german side it looks like: "Football is a simple game; 22 men chase a ball for 90 minutes and at the end, the Germans always win"...now we deserved it ;-) but it takes more than one decade...so come on england, just do it.

KingKanis
KingKanis

Thank you for this review, this make me proud !

Greetings from GERMANY.

KingKanis (Twitter)

LewisSmith2312
LewisSmith2312

A really well-thought article. English football definitely needs to adapt the academy structure from Germany; having a set number of players eligible to play for England would have to have a positive effect for the future national team. The new system of pitch sizes in youth football is a primary encouraging step (albeit a small one) but at least the FA is trying to implement new methods and learning from how other countries have succeed. I never previously knew about the 50+1 rule for ownership of German clubs, but it is has to be a positive move, that would be appreciated in English football. Of course fans get excited at the prospect of a big-name football possibly coming to the premiership, but I would definitely take more pride and excitement in having English academy players coming through the ranks to dominate in the premiership and European competitions. Also, by having more English players in the academies and an emphasise on technique while ensuring the English grit is kept would surely enhance the national team. The possibility that the premier league could be filled with possibly 70/80% of English players is exciting to me personally, and through playing in a big league and getting the playing time would help develop them too. How many young players (say under23) really excite fans to be the a top player? A handful at best? (Phil Jones, Jack Whilshere, Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain, Luke Shaw, Tom Ince). Would it not also be nice to have a greater percentage of English managers and staff? Only FOUR English managers currently manage in the premier league (Adkins, Allardyce, Pardew, Redknapp), okay there are 6 more that are either British or Irish but thats still only 50%!! Where's the opportunity for English managers? We have to learn and take pieces from other countries to kickstart things and almost put each part together as a jigsaw. Once again a great article, hopefully this sort of discussion can become more than just a that, and actually be implied to the beautiful game in England.

nergelag
nergelag

A really excellent piece, well written and well researched. It is beyond the realms of believability that English football could ever lay down a blueprint for success and drive it through. There are plenty of examples of UK sport doing this, cycling and cricket for example, but both have powerful governing bodies who control most of the funding and are capable of making decisions. In English football the opposite is true. The clubs have all the money and the FA is a lethargic organization incapable of making decisions. Wembley is a great facility, but if the FA was serious about moving english football forward, wouldn't the huge investment have been better spent on grass roots football. My son played from age 6 to 12 and in all that time his team saw half a dozen appearances by fa coaches. Skill training at this age is left to parents most of whom can't execute the skills themselves. The move to full size pitches at age 10 pretty much did it for my son (something the FA have finally changed) and he gave up football for tennis.

lawless67
lawless67

 @lawless67 Great article Joey, if we as a nation want to compete  we need to adopt to the German blue print.

e1848z
e1848z

I think when you hang your boots up the FA need to employ players like yourselves to redevelop the academies and use your experience in your career to formulate a strong plan to fix the english game. FA is run by too many people who have never played the game or understand it at grass roots level. I hope your previous reputation doesnt hold people back from allowing you to operate in this field somehow in the future. Strip back the mistakes you have made in life and you clearly know what you are talking about when it comes to football and have value. Yourself and people like stan collymore need to be involved within the FA and organisations like that for the game to truly move forward. Petition time maybe? 

MillanMUFC
MillanMUFC

Should more England players try to play abroad as you've done? - I guess it could benefit them in honing their technique and all.

MillanMUFC
MillanMUFC

Would it be alright to perhaps sacrifice the Premier League for the benefit of the national team? - personally I don't think the PL is helping  the team too much.

MillanMUFC
MillanMUFC

Brilliant article, Joey. So how long can this German dominance last? - 10/20 years and do you think England are on the right track? - must be noted that they seem to be focusing on technique far more than before with the emergence of Spain. How long until we can boast of a good national team?. Once again brilliant article, I just hope that England follow the German blue - print.

IvanRoglic
IvanRoglic

Great article. It's not about possession and pass it's about converting it into a result. Also team play and "not having" a player with leader role is crucial, BvB and Bayern can change five player and put young players who love the club and were in brought there as kids to jump in without team game and tactic fallin' apart unlike FCB game without Messi, Xavi or Iniesta or Real without Ronaldo.You really touched it to the core.

JordanJMcGregor
JordanJMcGregor

Got to say completely agree with this article, Germany as of late are and will be for years the dominant footballing nation. As shown above they structure there leauge and teams around local players and bring what is lacking in many leagues/teams which is a sense of spirit and passion for the club. Great Article and read!

duncanathomson
duncanathomson

Very good article, and a great read. I agree that many English, and British teams in general need to invest more in the future, whilst searching for young talent. I think a good indicator of the state of every country's league is to look at how the national team performs; if the national team performs well (e.g. Spain, Germany, Brazil), then that country has invested well, if not then they have invested poorly. The Brazilian league is a good example. Their national team performed exceptionally when they weren't focussing on bringing players in from around the world, however they have had a slight dip since more focus and money came in to their league with the sucess, meaning they have more money to invest in bringing in overseas players, this has not done the national team many favours.

alakehal
alakehal

That's what arsene Wagner is trying to do now with the signing of the Wilsher jenckinson Walcott Ox Gibbs. Problem is too many sheiks throw money at the players in the premier league for it to be effective. The FA needs to step in and stop these owners and claim their teams back.

whitetiger1250
whitetiger1250

Very good article. germany is an example as a sustainable league. the zero tolerance police is very nice. This protect the national talent which does not happen in England. Seems the FA does not give a sh** for this. of course foreing talent is very welcomed in Premier League, but we see today the small clubs signing players comming from country as Burundi, barbados, etc. This is ridiculous! Only a radical challenge which would develop home grown talent can bring England back to the top. Otherwise, Premier League will become a Wimbledon, great tournament with no English fighting for the top. 

Basio
Basio

good read

 

I am English and moved to Germany a few years ago and have a season ticket in Germany and it is a great league to watch

 

Low ticket prices, full stadiums, standing areas, beer in the grounds and great football

not a bad combination

 

the pro zone stats are interesting but one stat that stands out to me is related to continuity

Look at the national team since 1990

Germany have had 5 managers (you could argue 4 as Klinsman was just the front man for Low for a couple of years)

England have had 11

OK we have had a couple of interims in there but they all look like interims to me

 

The clubs are run the same look at Bayern the guys upstairs understand the game

Sammer, Bekanbauer, Honess all are football people and run the club on a long term football philosophy

 

Sadly I can’t honestly see how England can catch them for a long long time

jay236
jay236

Forgot to say, good article. I've read the same topic a lot recently by different newspapers but yours was the most interesting. Producing interesting stats that they didn't. Kiss joeys arse over

onsidesport
onsidesport

I agree that the German sides seem to be on the up, however, the big sides (Dortmund and Bayern) have very little to worry about domestically, meaning that they don't need to be in top gear to win games in their league. Therefore, when they come up against big teams in Europe, they can finally express themselves as they want to be - playing intense, high-speed football that relies on efficiency on the counter-attack, as we saw last week. However, I would not go as far as saying that what Bayern do is a blueprint for every side out there, because, I think that even Bayern would struggle to keep performing so well if they had to hit top gear week in, week out domestically - they just aren't challenged often enough, which is why the Premier League is still the best league in the world - it provides challenges even for the big sides. Put Bayern in England, and I wouldn't bet on them to win the league. 

jay236
jay236

The German league seems to be on the up at the moment but as wodders has said it is set up for bayern to dominate because they will always be the richest club in Germany. As highlighted in the premier league money can buy you succes, Chelsea and City being prime examples. Although a lot of German talent plays for German clubs at the minute I don't think the league will be able to keep them. Bayern being the only club that can compete with Europe on player wages for the top players. Goetze has already signed for bayern. How long will Reus, hummels, shurlle, gundogon etc stay at their respective clubs once the lure of europeon money comes calling. I believe all of those players will be playing in different leagues within a couple of years which sets the German league up as a feeder league for Europe. Maybe once fair play rules are brought in the German league will be on a more even playing field with Europe. Also why is there no talk of the Brazilian youth system, they consistently produce a world class team with world class players. Brazil are always one of the favorites to any competition and always have players considered to be some of the best in the world in any generation.

jay27byrne
jay27byrne

Clubs need their own ideas.Whoever innovates the most successfully are the most dominant .

Everybody tried copy Barcalona and all failed and now German football dominates .Clubs will now try change to a completely different youth system to the German style from the Spanish style.

Wodders
Wodders

The biggest problem with German football is that it is geared for Bayern Munich to succeed. The rules on ownership mean that Munich will always be by far the wealthiest club so they can cherry pick from others such as Dortmund when they put together strong teams. With out competition sport lacks entertainment.

LLCoolDave__
LLCoolDave__

What I love most about Bayern and Dortmunds approach is that they haven't sat back and fawned over whatever style of football was 'in vogue' at the time. France, Brazil, Spain, whatever.. They recognised that you have to build on your unique traits and national identity to produce a truly worldclass crop. Gareth Southgate et al the other mongs who seem to think England can adopt tiki-taka are dooming us to fail. We produce the fittest, fastest, and most powerful players in the world. Walcott, Bale, Gerrard, Rooney. We have to construct OUR OWN style if we want a genuine hope of recreating such wild success.

LucaTedde11
LucaTedde11

Great piece. I think Bayern's performance in the away leg was more impressive than the first, to go to the Nou Camp and limit Barca to not even a  real chance and score 3 is phenomenal. Their work rate, discipline and pressure on Barca was outstanding. They are a force but I dont think we are watching the greatest team ever, arguably you could say Barca were the best clubside ever 2-3 years ago. Barca are total football, which is admirable but they don't have a plan B. Bayern do. They can mix it. I mean if Barca were to go to stoke on a Monday night and Stoke scored an early goal, as good as Barca are, you could see a physical tough side like Stoke rattling their cage. Of course if Stoke went to the Nou Camp they'd probably lose 76nil but you get my drift. My point is, Bayern could go anywhere and win. If they win it this year, will they win it next? I dont know, slowly but surely teams will figure out how to stop them playing, if Mourinho came back to Chelsea, I'm sure they'd give them a game. I personally don't think Bayern will go on and wow us as much as Barca have. Yes the English game can learn a lot from Germany. I mean how many English players are linked with top clubs around the world?? bar Rooney? They're not as technically gifted as the Spanish, Germans and Italians and technical ability is the future, not power and strength. I'm only 20 and I can safely say England will not win a world cup in my lifetime. 

charlie78
charlie78

Good article Joey. My missus is German (I'm English) and I have to say that you'll find the same mentality throughout German culture, both socially and economically. Speaking generally, as a nation their goal is always sustainability - there is a dislike of displays of wealth, celebrity culture and one-upmanship behaviour, which can be seen from sport to politic to the workplace. This grounding provides a strong platform to build on, allowing steady growth, sustainability and realistic future targets. The 'get rich quick' culture prevalant throughout England, from housing, to finance and to football, is, as you say unsustainable. For there to be any progress I fear that there will have to be large-scale social change and in the case of football this would have to start with addressing debt, player salaries, ticket prices and by creating a long-term goal as the Germans did in 2002, built upon realistic growth.

garyparker92
garyparker92

Very interesting piece. Do you really think German football can dominant europe for a while? The english game dominated for a short time, as did the spanish but they all came to an end. Surely the German's will too?

Prevo10
Prevo10

Hi Joey, Enjoyed your article. Just out of interest have you noticed any difference to the academy set up in France compared to England? The reason I ask is that I have taken junior teams to play in an international tournament hosted by A.S Cannes (a French 4th division team just along the coast from you) and noticed their youth development set up seemed to be much different to that of professional clubs in England. AS Cannes have developed a strong reputation for developing and producing a number of top players over the years such as Zidane, Vieira, Micoud, Clichy, Le Tallec to name a few. One of the obvious differences is the academy set up is closely linked to its grassroots delivery. For example, at Under 11, the club will have up to 6 teams in that age group representing the club. The first team if you like will play at a higher level against other academy sides, but then the fourth team will compete in local youth leagues against local community football clubs. I have written about this set up in more detail on my blog which may be of interest: http://lookatthesescenes.com/2013/02/18/if-anyone-can-jan-koller-cannes/ The main difference was that players can remain in the clubs set up for longer and move up and down through the clubs representative teams at different levels. This takes into consideration an individual players growth and development rates over the years, but essentially keeps young players in a consistent set up and quality coaching structure. In England the release of players can be quite cut throat at youth level, and the gaps between an academy and the community quite large. If a player is deemed under developed physically at a given age it seems many clubs will not give that player a chance to develop first before making the decision to release him (even if he was technically gifted). The AS Cannes set up seems to tolerate this more because of its structure. Players that 'peak late' in their development could still get the opportunity to break through to the clubs first team as they have remained in the set up. Anyway I wondered if Marseille have a similar youth development set up, and if you think the model used by AS Cannes could be adopted and work with pro clubs in England? I feel it could certainly bring clubs closer to their communities from a player development point of view.

Pedro76
Pedro76

Good piece joey. As a fan of football in general, do you not think football dominance comes and goes?? The CL was dominated by English clubs for a few years, then Spanish, now Germans. Granted the way the bundesliga is run is something that will never happen here in England due to the stuffy blazers and the greed of the clubs and sky. Yes sky has transformed the way we watch tv and the footy landscape in general, and that has resulted in more foreigners coming here on over inflated wages. Clubs have to play these players, stifling any home grown talent. I am a Lfc fan and believe in Rodgers way of playing and in part fsc' s ideas of spotting young talent. Trouble is is that its not local young talent but foreign!! Would the premier league ever introduce a quota on foreign talent?? I doubt it as that wouldn't generate the overseas tv money that funds sky and the PL payments. I'm afraid England, who i will support for ever will realistically never challenge for major honours again unless the pl, fa and sky sort out the money and greed that influences our game.

MattyDH
MattyDH

Great read this, and all very accurate. Have to agree that both German and Spanish football is well ahead of the English now, where the German way is way ahead of the Spanish now-a-days, and will be for the next decade. In a way, I have always said Spanish football is over-rated, and they have just taken advantage of other countries been very poor. In particular, I find Barca over-rated; lately, I cannot help but believe it has been proven they are totally reliant on Messi. Plus, I find possession football very slow and boring. Watching the Bundesliga is a breath of fresh air, especially from watching Leeds. Every club attacks, every club plays attractive football, but every club has a plan B. The stadia are more often than not full, and this, I believe, is down to the 50+1 rule as stated by Joey. With the clubs in Germany, the fans do come first. Watching the celebrations of the Dortmund players with the fans after they beat Madrid 4-1 sent tingles down my spine...the last time I saw something like that as a Leeds fan was with Andy Hughes on the 8th May 2010! And I cannot remember the time before that! It is the same with most English clubs...the club and its players are too distant from the all too important people..the fans! However, this owuld not work in England...to many foreign owner, and the FA are too bothered about lining their pockets than improving our game.

 

This brings me onto the national team. The amount of foreign owners means the national team takes a back seat. Why are they bothered about whether England win trophies or not? Exactly, they aren't! Club academies at Englands 'top' clubs are full of foreigners. So yes, these clubs could produce the odd wonderkid, but they were brought from Spain, so they will play for Spain...where do England get the benefits of that?  Again, the rule should come in...80% of a clubs academy at every age group should be english, maye 70% at least.

 

Finally, I would like to ask about coaching. Joey, if you read this, could you look into the difference in coaching between the two countries. I am a young lad, who is taking his coaching badges. But what chance do I have making a career out of it. Without sounding big headed, and despite not playing as a professional, I reckon I know my stuff about football, with been the most technically gifted. So I could still make a decent coach, even at an academy level. But I will never get a chance here, all because I didn't play as a professional. Must mean I don't know my stuff? But in Germany, I believe the chance of qualified coaches gaining a career in football is quite high, as they are given a chance. The better coaches are given the job to bring through the youngsters at the academies, which I believe is the right way to go. So, even though I am highly passionate about the sport, I am having to seriously consider learning another language, and trying to carry on my coaching education elsewhere...I have already started to learn German as a consequence.

 

Sorry for the essay everyone, but this is something I feel very strongly about. Could go on all day if I am been honest!

 

 

Tommypatts
Tommypatts

Firstly, great write up Joey. Been saying it for a number of years, glad to see someone has finally put it to full voice. Coming from Australia, I'm not sure if you have ever followed or seen the a-league. However, recent champions central coast mariners have developed the same style system you have spoken about in you article. They don't rely on one or two star players, they have a well structure team on a shoestring budget with at least two players for each position who play regularly so in the case of injury they simply slide in un noticed. Of course the a league is not as big as the budesliga in terms of players and $$$ but they have adopted the same philosophy. Where an example of Sydney fc who had del peiro playing for them this season were cat piss when he wasn't around. You might not know what I'm taking about because you haven't seen much of it but I thought I'd share. The Germans will be marching towards next years World Cup as favorites in my opinion. Most of there young squad were revelations in South Africa so they know what it's like...I can't see England changing their ways too soon. Unfortunately to many proud people running the areas that counts.

Robert94
Robert94

Forgot to say great read.

Robert94
Robert94

All of England's "Top 4" star players are foreign whether its Mata , Santi , RVP, Aguero. This is one of the problems for England all those players cost together £100m, take Barca to argue this point : Xavi, Iniesta or Messi whoever you feel is most important player at Barca you will get same result for all 3 players, money spent: £0. Bayern and Borussia: Hummels/Lewy combined total of £7M and Bayern: Lahm/Schweinsteiger. That explains were the money should be invested: Youth System. The German League has been successfully for long time but the people of Britain have finally took notice because two German teams are in final, the league itself succeeds for 4 reasons : Full Stadiums, Youth System, Quality and Fan Ownership which out of 4 we only see one maybe 2 in England. Borussia Dortmund squad that squad that reached CL Final is almost made up from Youth System similar to Barca, they have different idea(s) to England and when the players feel the time to move is coming then Borussia generate massively from profits (Gotze to Bayern for example) and can take pride in knowing they produced X player. Bayern Munich are probaly best run club in the world they are and have been debt-free since 2009/10 season, they have brought in the most wanted manager in world football for next season Pep Guardiola but the thing that strikes me most about all this is that Bayern Munich have kept there own philosophy and added tika taka to this which results in: Techinally gifted players and physical players mixed in one like : Javi Martinez or Schweinsteiger. They have came back stronger each season after losing the final twice and would be deserved champions like Borussia Dortmund. As for Barca they need one world class centre back in Mats Hummels or Joey best friend Thiago Silva and if the succeed as this then Barca/Bayern will run the rule for years to come. For England they will look on jealously and wonder. This does not happen overnight. Lastly one fact to leave you all which is utterly staggering : Championship and Relegated QPR wage bill is higher than CL finalist Borussia Dortmund and Samba earns more than any Borussia Dortmund player including the now most wanted striker in the world in Robert Lewandowski. No big problem then.

Brian Wood
Brian Wood

Whilst an interesting and entertaining read, it is well worth noting that there has been no real period of 'dominance' from any one country. For a start in the year people claim that Spain have dominated, what has in fact happened is that 2 of the teams in the league have performed to their expectations in the Champions League. The rest of the tams in that league, perhaps bar Ath. Madrid, are average at best. This also applies to England, during out alleged dominance. Furthermore, during Spain, no sorry, Barcelona's ruling over the Champions League, English teams reached the semi finals in abundance over all other countries. Now I'm not bias towards the English, I in fact don't rate the league particularly high, but the fact that there was a Turkish team in the quarters instead on an English one doesn't mean that Turkish football is better then English. I think it is worth looking at the way in which we as football fans generalise the results of one competition to the order of football in the world. This also appears to be the way in which FIFA rank the countries. Uruguay performed well at the FIFA 2010 World Cup but only got through from a certain handball from a certain Liverpool player. Does this really make them the 4th best team in the world until 2014?Great read as always.   

amieexgoodall
amieexgoodall

Hi Joey! Great Article, just wondering if you could help me out massively for my final project at uni. I know you use social media ALOT to stress your views about football, could you give me a quick quote on how social media has changed football reporting? especially transfer news! ? Thanks x

ZiadRammal
ZiadRammal

Excellent article Joey..You're 100% right.I have a question about liverpool my favorite club:Rodgers said that he will use Borussia Dortmund’s blueprint for glory on a budget in his bid to take Liverpool back to the top.And as you know liverpool have many young talents (sterling,suso,wisdom,coady,yesil...).so do you think they should be given a proper chance  next season or they should be loaned out to get some experience?THANKS

Julien Sevat
Julien Sevat

Hello Joey, This is a great article. 

I would like to agree with you regarding the german domination however this has been coming for the last three years when you look more into it. Bayern Munchen has been one of the most consistent team in the last three years with a 3 finals out of four. As you also wrote, they are not spending wisely, looking first into their league and then adding the extra value such as Robben, Ribbery or Javi Matinez who broke the transfer fee for Bayern Munchen.

It is also interesting to see the way the clubs help each other. A few months ago, a munich club was financially in trouble and the Bayern Munchen did everything it could to help them. This is not something we would have seen in France, England or even in Spain. 

Football should be an investment in the future, this is why you build a program, a football academy  and a strong team and you trust your coach, However with the huge amount of money that has been put in this sport in the last 20 years we have seen a change on result expectation. Coach and managers will be changed after poor results, players will leave  they home club for more money¨, and fans will change teams because of more money invested suddendly. Finally in the early 80, Platini signed a contract for Juve for 1.2 million ( more or less). this is the same amount that a player make now in a month or a year ( depending the team), Too few players are like you  Joey, willing to take a pay cute to stay in Marseille, which I hope you will, so we can come again and see you at practice!

Good luck with the rest of the season and I hope that you will become the Marseille captain if Steve Mandanda decide to go.

 

tariq91
tariq91

one hell of a blog! take a bow for all those analysis n of course d statistics! I could notice one thing that, in the stats, the columns where bayern are superior is where their foreign players like robben, mandzukic, ribery, make a huge contribution... but dortmund, a team which has more academy players, also managed to reach the champs league final as of now... but they couldn't better bayern in the league.. there is a huge difference in their league points which speaks of consistency. .. and the team germany, that reached the semi finals of euro 2012, played an obviously very attractive brand of football with a very young team, still couldn't reach the finals, where spain did and eventually won it. .. it is true that germans are evolving but nobody can be sure that their system is feasible for creating an era of dominance like spain did, and the spanish are not officially de throned. not just yet... so the germans have to prove themselves in WC 2014,... its world cup 2014 because it is about time they start to win competitions after their major overhaul in 2000.... because if England had to be suggested to follow them in their footsteps, the germans should deliver because, 14 years should prove that it is worth the wait... I'd rather keep watching EPL in its current style and keep supporting Manchester united and England even if they couldn't win champions league or world cup 2026, than watching them go down in the group stages and couldn't dominate for 15 long years! and at the end, end up not winning anything. thanx Tariq. (India)

Antoswords
Antoswords

Well written article Joey. I have a question though. Is it that the Germans just use a process that is so typically German, that is, that it is in their psyche to approach it in an almost mechanical way through continuous improvement. Looking at the bigger picture and addressing problems or shortcomings at a basic level in the game, and slowly improving step by step over a period of years instead of throwing money all over the place like they do in the premier league in the hope of short term success?

Paul0909
Paul0909

Brilliant read again joey. I'm a Liverpool fan so am glad to see rodgers giving some youngsters a chance as we know we cant compete with the money other clubs have. All the best with your new career in France

RyanTrumpeter
RyanTrumpeter

The Fa's structure is horrendous. Were teaching our kids things that the dutch were using four/five year's ago. The FA let grassroots continue to be a shambles. They should put rules in place where under 16 managers should be a level 2 coach at the bare minimum. But they should also reduce the prices of these coaching badges so your normal working man/woman can afford to educate themselves. The FA actuslly need a philosophy rather than getting in a manager who decides how we play. We need consistency! They need a format to educate our youngsters and most of all we need philosophy which is taught from under 8's through to adults.

Jimmyjames82
Jimmyjames82

Great article and highlights everything bad about British football when compared to Germans! Another fact worth highlighting is German footballs attendances and ticket prices compared to that in Britain, I'm a dundee united fan and currently you pay £300 for a season ticket to watch abismal SPL football, compare that to £159 to watch Dortmund for a season it's not hard to see why there attendances are so impressive!

PeterMunday
PeterMunday

A great informative read. Personally, I would welcome a new footballing philosophy in the Premier League. Firstly, the English game needs effective and robust legislation implemented, which would limit the risk of insolvency and address the contentious issue of foreign ownership. Also, regarding the national team, perhaps a system similar to that in American Football (clubs drafting the best young talent from colleges etc) may be a viable option that helps to produce a more talented pool of English footballers. Would be interesting to hear some thoughts on this.

Chipster
Chipster

Interesting read that Joey. We need to introduce more of our home grown players, to do that there's got to be a cap introduced! If the premier league suffers so be it! You are right at the end of the day it's unsustainable

ArthurForbanLarose
ArthurForbanLarose

I've always thought that German football (FA and bundesliga) such as English football (FA and premier league) were the best football ever in Europe and even in the worldwide, you know I'm french and the FFF is so boring, also, medias and people here are deeply in love with spain or argentina this is not football this is dancing, my grandma could play this way ! Okay they won wolrd cup, and all, but i'm really not enjoying how they play. 

With Germans, football's going to be sooooo much better, I like it :)

 

I'm Arthur Larose, i'm french (sorry for my english), even if i'm more PSG (sorry dude), I would like you to stay in france, in marseille cause you are the kind of players I want in ligue 1

 

Have a nice day sir Joey

*bow In Respect*